Posts by Arthur Arts

Scala Snippet: How to filter a list in Scala

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Arthur Arts

In Scala, filtering and processing collections is easy and elegant. There are many filtermethods available, but the most used will probably the basic filter method. Here's a code example of some filtering on my (ex)camera collection. The filter method will not only work on Lists, but on any Scala collection.

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Scala Snippet: multiline statements in the Scala REPL console

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Arthur Arts

One of the coolest things a standard Scala install will give you, is the Scala interpreter. Technically speaking, this is not an interpreter. In the background, each statement is quickly compiled into bytecode and executed on the jvm. Therefore, most people refer to it as the Scala REPL: Read-Evaluate-Print-Loop. You can access it by starting a command shell on your system and typing in 'scala'. Do make sure your either run it from the place where scala is installed or have scala on your environment PATH. By using the repl, you can quickly experiment and test out different statements. Once you press ENTER it will evaluate the statement and display the result. Frequently you want to execute multi-line statements and luckily the repl has a solution for that. Simply type in :paste and the repl will accept multiline statements. To exit this mode and evaluate your code, simply type CTRL+D. Example:

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Bruce Lee's Top 5 Agile Coaching Tips

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Arthur Arts

When I was a kid, I was a big Bruce Lee fan. I walked around the playground rubbing my nose with my thumb. When I had a piece of rope, I had to do my version of the nunchaku routine from Way of the Dragon and made cat-like noises. Looking back at Lee, I find it quite striking how many of the principles of his fighting style Jeet Kun Do apply to agile practices. Check out these descriptions of the fighting style:

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Scala Snippet: Case Class vs plain ordinary Class

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Arthur Arts

In Scala there exist the construct of a 'case class'. According to Martin Odersky this supports you to write a "regular, non-encapsulated data structure". It always seems to be associated with pattern matching. So when to use a case class and when to use a 'plain' class? I found this nice explanation stating: _"Case classes can be seen as plain and immutable data-holding objects that should exclusively depend on their constructor arguments. This functional concept allows us to

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Scrum Master Tip: Make it transparent!

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Arthur Arts

I am frequently asked by colleagues for advice on how to be a good Scrum Master. I will discuss some of the tips I share in a couple of blog posts. First of all I do like to state that I believe it's best to have a Scrum Master that is able to get his hands dirty in the activities of the team (i.e. coding, analyzing, designing, testing etc.). It will enable him/her to engage and coach at more levels than just overall process. In my opinion one of the most important things a Scrum Master has to do is to make things transparant for the whole team. Now this seems like very simple advice, and it is. However, when you are in the middle of a sprint and all kinds of (potential) impediments are making successfully reaching the sprint goal harder and harder, the danger of losing transparency always pops up. Here are three practical tips:

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Mock a superclass method with Mockito

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Arthur Arts

Say you want to test a method from class which extends some kind of superclass. Sometimes you can be dependent on code in the superclass, which is undesirable in a test. Now actually, the first thing you should consider is to refactor your code, because it’s violating the Single Responsibility design principle: there is more than one reason why your class is subject to change. Another advice is to favor composition over inheritence. In this way you can mock the code you are collaborating with. Having said that, sometimes you run into legacy code you just have to work with and aren’t able to refactor due to circumstances. Here’s a trick I found on Stackoverflow to “mock” a superclass method to do nothing with mockito.

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The Quick & Dirty Fraud

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Arthur Arts

If you have a car, then every once in a while, you probably have your vehicle checked to see if it's still up to safety and environmental standards. So you take your car to the garage and have it checked. Now, the garage will do some tests and eventually you'll get a nice paper showing what kind of maintenance they have done.

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The Lean-Agile Connection

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Arthur Arts

Most people working in professional IT-driven companies, have heard about Agile, most people in professional companies have heard about Lean. Those who are interested in the subject, have found out that these two very popular phrases are actually closely related. So what _is_ the relation between lean and agile? I'll try to briefly answer this question and will start with a little history.

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Tasty Test Tip: Test final and static methods with PowerMock and Mockito

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Arthur Arts

Two of the most famous mocking frameworks EasyMock and Mockito, don't offer out of the box support for mocking final and static methods. It is often said on forums that "you don't want that" or "your code is badly designed" etc. Well this might be true some of the time, but not all of the time. So let's suppose you do have a valid reason to want to mock final or static methods, PowerMock allows you to do it. Here's how (example with Mockito):

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