Coding

Awesome Asciidoctor: Collapsible Content

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

Since Asciidoctor 2.0.0 we can add the collapsible option to an example block. When the markup is generated to HTML we get a HTML details and summary section. The content of the example block is collapsed (default behaviour because it is in a details section) and a clickable text is available to open the collapsed block (the summary section), so we can see the actual content. The text we can click on is by default Details, but we can change that by setting the title of the example block. Then the title is used as the text to click on to open the collapsed content.

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Micronaut Mastery: Parse String Value With Kb/Mb/Gb To Number

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

Micronaut can convert String values defined as a number followed by (case-insensitive) KB/MB/GB to a number value in certain cases. The conversion service in Micronaut supports the @ReadableBytes annotation that we can apply to a method parameter. Micronaut will then parse the String value and convert it to a number. The value 1Kb is converted to 1024. We can use this for example in a configuration class or path variable in a controller.

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Micronaut Mastery: Binding Request Parameters To POJO

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

Micronaut supports the RFC-6570 URI template specification to define URI variables in a path definition. The path definition can be a value of the @Controller annotation or any of the routing annotations for example @Get or @Post. We can define a path variable as {?binding*} to support binding of request parameters to all properties of an object type that is defined as method argument with the name binding. We can even use the Bean Validation API (JSR380) to validate the values of the request parameters if we add an implementation of this API to our class path.

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Groovy Goodness: Use Expanded Variables in SQL GString Query

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

Working with SQL database from Groovy code is very easy using the groovy.sql.Sql class. The class has several methods to execute a SQL query, but we have to take special care if we use methods from Sql that take a GString argument. Groovy will extract all variable expressions and use them as values for placeholders in a PreparedStatement constructed from the SQL query. If we have variable expressions that should not be extracted as parameters for a PreparedStatement we must use the Sql.expand method. This method will make the variable expression a groovy.sql.ExpandedVariable object. This object is not used as parameter for a PreparedStatement query, but the value is evaluated as GString variable expression.

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Spicy Spring: Group Loggers With Logical Name

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

Spring Boot 2.1 introduced log groups. A log group is a logical name for one or more loggers. We can define log groups in our application configuration. Then we can set the log level for a group, so all loggers in the group will get the same log level. This can be very useful to change a log level for multiple loggers that belong together with one setting. Spring Boot already provides two log groups by default: web and sql. In the following list we see which loggers are part of the default log groups:

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Gradle Goodness: Generate Javadoc In HTML5

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

Since Java 9 we can specify that the Javadoc output must be generated in HTML 5 instead of the default HTML 4. We need to pass the option -html5 to the javadoc tool. To do this in Gradle we must add the option to the javadoc task configuration. We use the addBooleanOption method of the options property that is part of the javadoc task. We set the argument to html5 and the value to true.

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Gradle Goodness: Rerun Incremental Tasks At Specific Intervals

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

One of the most important features in Gradle is the support for incremental tasks. Incremental tasks have input and output properties that can be checked by Gradle. When the values of the properties haven’t changed then the task can be marked as up to date by Gradle and it is not executed. This makes a build much faster. Input and output properties can be files, directories or plain object values. We can set a task input property with a date or date/time value to define when a task is up to date for a specific period. As long as the value of the input property hasn’t changed (and of course also the other input and output property values) Gradle will not rerun task and mark it as up to date. This is useful for example if a long running task (e.g. large integration test suite) only needs to run once a day or another period.

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Micronaut Mastery: Configuration Property Name Is Lowercased And Hyphen Separated

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

In Micronaut we can inject configuration properties in different ways into our beans. We can use for example the @Value annotation using a string value with a placeholder for the configuration property name. If we don’t want to use a placeholder we can also use the @Property annotation and set the name attribute to the configuration property name. We have to pay attention to the format of the configuration property name we use. If we refer to a configuration property name using @Value or @Property we must use lowercased and hyphen separated names (also known as kebab casing). Even if the name of the configuration property is camel cased in the configuration file. For example if we have a configuration property sample.theAnswer in our application.properties file, we must use the name sample.the-answer to get the value.

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Setup React + Typescript + Storybook all using the same SCSS

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Patrick Ooteman

So ok. You found out that React is super cool. Even more cool when you’re able to use Typescript AND storybook to showcase your reusable components! This article is a fantastic base to set it all up: https://dev.to/swyx/quick-guide-to-setup-your-react—​typescript-storybook-design-system-1c51 or use this github example: https://github.com/JoshSchreuder/storybook3-typescript-example . But I’m missing something here. I’d love to be able to use the scss files used in my app to style the components in storybook the same way. Searching through all the blogs and forums, it all seems to be kinda unclear how to do so. After tweaking some bits, adding webpack config to the storybook files and even (un)ejecting React, I found out adding your global scss style is fairly simple, even though it feels like you should’nt be using it like this. How? These are the steps:

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