Scala

Chaining Options

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Tammo Sminia

When we have multiple Options and only want to do something when they're all set. In this example we have a property file with multiple configurations for one thing. A host and a port, we only want to use them if they're both set.

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Scala Snippet: How to filter a list in Scala

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Arthur Arts

In Scala, filtering and processing collections is easy and elegant. There are many filtermethods available, but the most used will probably the basic filter method. Here's a code example of some filtering on my (ex)camera collection. The filter method will not only work on Lists, but on any Scala collection.

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Time libraries in Scala

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Tammo Sminia

Scala has no default way to deal with dates and times. We have a few options. java.util.Date and java.util.Calendar These come included with java, so they may do if you don't need to do much and don't want to add any dependencies. But they're horrible and it's best not to use them. Joda-Time http://www.joda.org/joda-time/ The de facto standard date and time library for Java. nscala-time https://github.com/nscala-time/nscala-time A thin scala layer around Joda-Time. This adds some implicit conversions to make it easier to use, like the + and < operators.

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Scala Snippet: Case Class vs plain ordinary Class

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Arthur Arts

In Scala there exist the construct of a 'case class'. According to Martin Odersky this supports you to write a "regular, non-encapsulated data structure". It always seems to be associated with pattern matching. So when to use a case class and when to use a 'plain' class? I found this nice explanation stating: _"Case classes can be seen as plain and immutable data-holding objects that should exclusively depend on their constructor arguments. This functional concept allows us to

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