Groovy Goodness: Turn Method Parameters Into Named Map Arguments With IntelliJ IDEA

A very useful feature in Groovy is the use of named arguments. Instead of a list of arguments for a method or constructor we can use a Map argument. If the argument is the first in the list of arguments then Groovy allows use to use named arguments when we invoke the method or constructor. This means all key/value arguments are gathered together and assigned to the Map argument. Inside our method or constructor we can then access the Map argument and get the values for the keys. This leads to better readable code and that is very useful. IntelliJ IDEA has a Groovy intention to turn method parameters into a Map parameter for named arguments with a few mouse clicks.

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Gradle Goodness: Quickly Open Test Report in IntelliJ IDEA

When we execute a Gradle test task in IntelliJ IDEA the IDE test runner is used. This means we can get a nice overview of all tests that have run. If a test is successful we get a green light, otherwise it is red in case of an error or orange in case of a failure. Gradle also generates a nice HTML report when we run the test task. It is placed in the directory build/reports/tests/. IntelliJ IDEA has a button which opens this report when we click on it. The following screenshot shows the button with the tooltip that opens a Gradle test report:

Written with IntelliJ IDEA 14 and Gradle 2.6.

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Easy Editing ResourceBundle Property Files in IntelliJ IDEA

We can add a resourcebundle property file to our application to support internationalization (i18n). The file contains key-value pairs where the value is a localized value per supported language or locale. In IntelliJ IDEA we can easily see which keys are not yet translated. We open a resourcebundle property file and click on the ResourceBundle tab at the bottom of the editor. We get a list of all available keys on the left and on the right a text area per supported language with the translated values. If a key is not translated for all supported languages it will be colored in red. We only have to select the keys in red and fill in the values on the right for the given languages.

Sample with IntelliJ IDEA 13.1.1

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Coloring Different Data Sources in IntelliJ IDEA

The database plugin in IntelliJ IDEA is a useful tool to work with data in databases. As long as we got a JDBC driver to connect to the database we can configure a data source. And then we can run queries, inspect the contents of tables and change data with the database tool window. It is not uncommon to have multiple data sources, for example development and test environment databases, which will have the same tables. When we open the tables or run queries we don’t have a visual feedback to see to which data source such a table belongs. To have a visual feedback we can colorize our data source. This means we assign a color to a data source and when we open a table from that data source the tab color in the editor window will have a different color than other tabs or the background color of the data source objects have a color.

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Grails Goodness: Run Forked Tests in IntelliJ IDEA

In the latest Grails releases we can execute our tests in so-called forked mode. This means a separate JVM is started with an isolated classpath from the Grails build system. When we want to run our tests in forked mode from within IntelliJ IDEA we get the following error: Error running forked test-app: Could not load grails build listener class (Use --stacktrace to see the full trace). To make running tests in forked mode work with IntelliJ IDEA we must add one of the IntelliJ IDEA supplied JAR files to the Grails classpath.

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Search for Anything with Search Everywhere in IntelliJ IDEA

IntelliJ IDEA 13 has a new feature Search Everywhere. With this feature we can search for files, actions, classes, settings and more using a simple search dialog box. We must press the Shift button twice to get the Search Everywhere dialog.

We get a simple input field where we can start typing what we search for. For example we want to search for the file BuildConfig.groovy. We start typing the first letters of the filename and immediately we get to see some results:

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