Integrate Angular in Spring Boot with Gradle

Having a Angular HTML5 single page application and a Spring Boot application, we would like to serve the complete Angular app from Spring Boot. This blog shows you a couple simple steps to get everything up and running: run NPM from Gradle, integrate the Gradle frontend build in the main build and support HTML5 mode in the ResourceHandler of Spring Boot.

Run NPM from Gradle

Create a subdirectory called frontend with the frontend code and build scripts (webpack, npm). Let’s assume our npm start and npm run watch output to the /frontend/dist/ directory.

First we need to make sure the frontend code is build when we run gradle build on our project. We can use the plugin gradle-node-plugin for this. Go ahead and create a /frontend/build.gradle file.

Now, if we run a gradle build from our frontend subdirectory:

  • node will be downloaded
  • npm install will be executed
  • npm run build will be executed

Run integrated Gradle build

To run the frontend submodule integrated from our root project, all we need to do is include a settings.gradle at the root of the project.

Go ahead and run gradle build from the root of our project and see that npm is downloaded and the expected npm tasks are run.

We need to include the distribution of the frontend build in the JAR. Thus the frontend:build task needs to be run before we process the resources of the JAR. Go ahead and add the following snippet to /build.gradle.

Support Angular HTML5 mode

Now all we need to do is create support for HTML5 mode in Angular. Angular is a single page application and subroutes of the application are default served with a ‘#’ hashtag separator. If we want to have regular paths, we can enable HTML5 mode. The problem in serving this Angular HTML5 application from Spring Boot is that the Spring Boot ResourceHandler cannot find these resources, since the real resources is the index.html with the JavaScript files. With the next code snippet we instruct Spring Boot to look for the index.html as well. This is inspired by http://stackoverflow.com/questions/24837715/spring-boot-with-angularjs-html5mode

Happy coding!

Caching HTTP requests in AngularJS

In AngularJS, especially when you’re using a ‘modern’ Web Component like approach, you often have directives request the same information from your services multiple times. Since we’d rather not do round-trips we don’t need to to save on server resources caching is our go-to solution. In this post I will show two different approaches to caching resources: the built-in angular way using $resource and a home-grown solution.

Original post

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Experiences at Google IO 2016

From May 18-20 myself and Richard attended the Google IO 2016 conference. We both visited different tracks and have some different experiences we’d like to share. Here are mine. Read on about topics in the likes of VR, Progressive Web Apps, and Artificial Intelligence. For a quick impression have a look at the photo album.

Google CEO Pichai during Google IO keynote at the Amfitheater
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Grasping AngularJS 1.5 directive bindings by learning from Angular 2

In AngularJS 1.5 we can use attribute binding to allow easy use of input-only, output-only and two-way attributes for a directive or component.

Instead of manually parsing, watching and modifying attribute values through code, we can simply specify an attribute binding by adding a property to the object hash of:

In this blog post we will learn how attribute bindings differ between AngularJS 1.5 and Angular 2 and what we can learn from Angular 2 to make your HTML and JavaScript in Angular 1.5 more descriptive.
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Using `$q.defer()` in AngularJS? Try the $q ‘constructor’ instead.

Although I’m a great fan of using the ($q) Promise API in AngularJS, I never really liked using $q.defer() and its Deferred API. I always found using var deferred = $q.defer() together with $.resolve(..) and $.reject(..) to be too verbose.

After recently checking the $q service documentation I stumbled upon the $q constructor that results in way less verbose code.

To illustrate the usage of the $q constructor I will create a function that wraps the result of a Geolocation#getCurrentPosition invocation as an AngularJS $q promise.

Using the traditional $q.defer() approach the function wrapper will look like this.

When using the $q constructor, I could rewrite the code as follows, resulting in less verbose code:

And since in this case we are merely passing through the arguments of the success and error callbacks, I could rewrite the code to be even smaller:

As you can see, using the $q constructor produces code with less boilerplate, making it more readable in the process.

Notice that although it’s being called the “$q constructor” we are not actually doing a new on $q.
Possibly, the AngularJS team calls it this way because it mimics the ECMAScript 2015 Promise constructor API.

Next to the $q constructor there are some other alternatives to using the verbose $q.defer().
In most cases you can probably use a less verbose alternative as is nicely described in this blog post that I stumbled upon while doing some additional research for my own blog post.

Unit testing an AngularJS directive’s private functions.

As we all know Javascript gives us the awesome ability to create functions inside functions. This allows us to create private functions which support the main function. It is also something we do often when creating object functions. This structure is used by angular for the creation of providers and directives alike.

Every once in a while I personally come to a point where I would like to test these private functions. This is especially true for use cases in Angular such as directives. Continue reading

Communication between Angular Controller and Directive

Since I had issues finding a good explanation on how to tie together a controller and a directive with isolated scope I decided to create my own blog post on this subject. This repo contains a runnable example of the solution. It contains a Spring Boot Web Application that can be started to act as a HTTP server but all the interesting stuff is in the src/main/webapp folder.

Problem description

To create modular code with AngularJS you want to create reusable components; directives. Directives should not depend in any way on the parent controller. They should not be able to see any of the parent scope unless it’s explicitly provided to them. To do this Angular directives can have an isolated scope (which in my opinion should be the default). Continue reading

ngImprovedTesting 0.3: improved ModuleBuilder with lots of bug fixes

NOTE: ngImprovedTesting is AngularJS library to make mock testing AngularJS code more easy.
For more information about ngImprovedTesting be sure to read its (updated) introductory blog post.

Just released version 0.3 ngImprovedTesting with a much improved ModuleBuilder.

Prior to 0.3 usage of ngImprovedTesting might be troublesome due to fact that the ModuleBuilder:
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Stateless Spring Security Part 3: JWT + Social Authentication

This third and final part in my Stateless Spring Security series is about mixing previous post about JWT token based authentication with spring-social-security. This post directly builds upon it and focusses mostly on the changed parts. The idea is to substitude the username/password based login with “Login with Facebook” functionality based on OAuth 2, but still use the same token based authentication after that.

Login flow

Client-side

The user clicks on the “Login with Facebook” button which is a simple link to “/auth/facebook”, the SocialAuthenticationFilter notices the lack of additional query parameters and triggers a redirect leading the user of your site to Facebook. They login with their username/password and are redirected back, again to “/auth/facebook” but this time with “?code=…&state=…” parameters specified. (If the user previously logged in at facebook and had a cookie set, facebook will even instantly redirect back and no facebook screen is shown at all to the user.) The fun part is that you can follow this in a browsers network log as it’s all done using plain HTTP 302 redirects. (The “Location” header in the HTTP response is used to tell the browser where to go next)

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