Spock

Spocklight: Mocks And Stubs Returning Sequence of Values

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

Creating and working with mocks and stubs in Spock is easy. If we want to interact with our mocks and stubs we have several options to return values. One of the options is the triple right shift operator >>>. With this operator we can define different return values for multiple invocations of the stubbed or mocked method. For example we can use the >>> operator followed by a list of return values ['abc', 'def', 'ghi']. On the first invocation abc is return, the second invocation returns def and the third (and following) invocation(s) return ghi.

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Spocklight: Only Run Specs Based On Conditions

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

In a previous blog post we have seen the IgnoreIf extension. There is also a counterpart: the Requires extension. If we apply this extension to a feature method or specification class than the method or whole class is executed when the condition for the @Requires annotation is true. If the condition is false the method or specification is not executed. As a value for the @Requires annotation we must specify a closure. In the closure Spock adds some properties we can use for our conditions:

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Spocklight: Undo Changes in Java System Properties

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

If we need to add a Java system property or change the value of a Java system property inside our specification, then the change is kept as long as the JVM is running. We can make sure that changes to Java system properties are restored after a feature method has run. Spock offers the RestoreSystemProperties extension that saves the current Java system properties before a method is run and restores the values after the method is finished. We use the extension with the @RestoreSystemProperties annotation. The annotation can be applied at specification level or per feature method.

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Spocklight: Auto Cleanup Resources

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

Spcok has a lot of nice extensions we can use in our specifications. The AutoCleanup extension makes sure the close() method of an object is called each time a feature method is finished. We could invoke the close() method also from the cleanup method in our specification, but with the @AutoCleanup annotation it is easier and immediately shows our intention. If the object we apply the annotation to doesn't have a close() method to invoke we can specify the method name as the value for the annotation. Finally we can set the attribute quiet to true if we don't want to see any exceptions that are raised when the close() method (or custom method name, that is specified) is invoked.

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Spocklight: Optimize Run Order Test Methods

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

Spock is able to change the execution order of test methods in a specification. We can tell Spock to re-run failing methods before successful methods. And if we have multiple failing or successful tests, than first run the fastest methods, followed by the slower methods. This way when we re-run the specification we immediately see the failing methods and could stop the execution and fix the errors. We must set the property optimizeRunOrder in the runner configuration of the Spock configuration file. A Spock configuration file with the name SpockConfig.groovy can be placed in the classpath of our test execution or in our USER_HOME/.spock directory. We can also use the Java system property spock.configuration and assign the filename of our Spock configuration file.

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Spocklight: Including or Excluding Specifications Based On Annotations

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

One of the lesser known and documented features of Spock if the external Spock configuration file. In this file we can for example specify which specifications to include or exclude from a test run. We can specify a class name (for example a base specification class, like DatabaseSpec) or an annotation. In this post we see how to use annotations to have some specifications run and others not.

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Spocklight: Extra Data Variables for Unroll Description

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

Spock's unroll feature is very powerful. The provider data variables can be used in the method description of our specification features with placeholders. For each iteration the placeholders are replaced with correct values. This way we get a nice output where we immediately can see the values that were used to run the code. Placeholders are denoted by a hash sign (#) followed by the variable name. We can even invoke no-argument methods on the variable values or access properties. For example if we have a String value we could get the upper case value with #variableName.toUpperCase(). If we want to use more complex expressions we must introduce a new data variable in the where block. The value of the variable will be determined for each test invocation and we can use the result as a value in the method description.

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