Extending Selenium with page objects

As all who have used it know Selenium is a powerful tool when testing front-end applications. I personally use it in combination with protractor. This is because most of the work I do is with Angular and AngularJS applications.

When you are using Typescript extending classes is an easy thing. In light of this I’ve been experimenting with new approaches to creating page objects. Continue reading

Test code separation

As someone who spends quite some time writing and checking unit and e2e tests I’ve started noticing a trend I’m somewhat confused by. There have been multiple occasions in which I’ve encountered test logic (repeatable and single use) in either test specifications or page objects.

So I decided to share my approach to writing and foremost separating my test code into three categories. Those being: Specifications , Sequences and Page Objects.

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Combining locators in protractor

I’d like to start with the following service announcement,

you really shouldn’t need this.

That being said; I’ve started using a third party component library which led to a use-case for this.

It so happened that i was creating a page object for a component library called ag-grid. At first glance i thought nothing special about it; and that i could retrieve rows normally. ag-grid however supports the pinning of columns to the left and/or right side of the list. And these rows then fall inside their own respective markups.

Now you can easily create a structure allowing me to target the (non-)pinned columns. But for ease of use being able to get full set of cells can also be useful and might be more suited for the test case.

This led to the creation of the following code.

As you can see it returns a new ElementArrayFinder which is the return type for the all locator and thus what we need for the aggregate.

In order to create the aggregate response it resolves each locator’s getWebElements response through Promise.all. It then fulfils the deferredAggregate with the promised results reduced to a single WebElement array.

In this implementation the combinedLocator.toString is also supplied. This is to ensure that feedback for this aggregation also contains all locators in the message. For the creation of the ElementArrayFinder itself it is not required though

TypeScript and ES6 import syntax

When I started using TypeScript for my Angular applications, I was confused about all the different ways with which you could import other modules.

import './polyfills.ts';
import { Component } from '@angular/core';
import HomeComponent from './pages/home/home-page.component';
import * as _ from 'lodash';
import assert = require('assert');

At first, I thought that as a programmer you could choose whether you wanted to use curly braces or not, but I quickly found out that that was not the case. It all depends on how the module that you are importing is structured.

I have created an overview of the different ways by which a module can be exported, together with their corresponding import syntax. Most of them are actually plain ECMAScript 2015 (ES6) module syntax that TypeScript uses as well.

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