Gradle Goodness: Source Sets As IntelliJ IDEA Modules

IntelliJ IDEA 2016.1 introduced better support for Gradle source sets. Each source set in our project becomes a module in the IntelliJ IDEA project. And each module has it’s own dependencies, also between source sets. For example if we simply apply the java plugin in our project we already get two source sets: main and test. For compiling the test sources there is a dependency to the main source set. IntelliJ now knows how to handle this.

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Ratpacked: Debugging Application Defined Using Groovy DSL In IntelliJ IDEA

When we want to debug our Ratpack application written in Java we can simply use the Debug action on the main application class. When we described the application with the Groovy DSL we must add a Groovy runtime configuration to our project in IntelliJ IDEA to support debugging of the (R|r)atpack.groovy script file.

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Ratpacked: Groovy DSL Code Completion In IntelliJ IDEA

Ratpack applications can be written in Java and Groovy. The Java API is already very clean and on top is a Groovy DSL to work with Ratpack. When we use Groovy we can use the DSL, which allows for more clean code. The Ratpack developers have used the @DelegateTo annotation in the source code for the DSL definition. The annotation can be used to indicate which class or interface is used as delegate to execute the closure that is passed to the method. And this helps us a lot in the code editor of IntelliJ IDEA, because IDEA uses this information to give us code completion when we use the Groovy DSL in Ratpack. And that makes using the DSL very easy, because we rely on the IDE to give us the supported properties and methods and we make less mistakes.

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Groovy Goodness: Turn Method Parameters Into Named Map Arguments With IntelliJ IDEA

A very useful feature in Groovy is the use of named arguments. Instead of a list of arguments for a method or constructor we can use a Map argument. If the argument is the first in the list of arguments then Groovy allows use to use named arguments when we invoke the method or constructor. This means all key/value arguments are gathered together and assigned to the Map argument. Inside our method or constructor we can then access the Map argument and get the values for the keys. This leads to better readable code and that is very useful. IntelliJ IDEA has a Groovy intention to turn method parameters into a Map parameter for named arguments with a few mouse clicks.

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Groovy Goodness: IntelliJ IDEA Intentions For String Values

The best IDE to use when developing Groovy code is IntelliJ IDEA. The Groovy plugin has some nice intentions for us that we can use to optimise and refactor our code. We will look at some of the intentions that deal with String values in this blog post. The intentions shown here work in the free Community Edition as well in the paid Ultimate Edition. To see the possible intentions in IDEA we must select the Show Intentions Action. We need to check our shortcut keys to see the assigned shortcut. On my Mac it is for example Alt+Enter. Alternatively we can press the Shift key twice and type in Show intentions. IDEA will show the action with the shortcut key for us.

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Grails Goodness: Run Forked Tests in IntelliJ IDEA

In the latest Grails releases we can execute our tests in so-called forked mode. This means a separate JVM is started with an isolated classpath from the Grails build system. When we want to run our tests in forked mode from within IntelliJ IDEA we get the following error: Error running forked test-app: Could not load grails build listener class (Use --stacktrace to see the full trace). To make running tests in forked mode work with IntelliJ IDEA we must add one of the IntelliJ IDEA supplied JAR files to the Grails classpath.

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