Awesome Asciidoc: Change URI Scheme for Assets

When we define the document attribute icons with the value font the FontAwesome fonts are loaded in the generated HTML page. In the head section of the HTML document a link element to the FontAwesome CSS on https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs is added. Also when we use the highlight.js or Prettify source highlighter a link to the Javascript files on the cdnjs.cloudflare.com server is generated. We can change the value of the scheme from https to http by setting the attribute asset-uri-scheme to http. Or we can leave out the scheme so a scheme-less URI is generated for the links. A scheme-less URI provides the benefit that the same protocol of the origin HTML page is used to get the CSS or Javascript files from the cdnjs.cloudflare.com server. Remember this might provide a problem if the HTML page is opened locally.

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Gradle Goodness: Suppress Progress Logging

Gradle has some sophisticated progress logging on the console. For example we can see how much percentage of the building process is done. The percentage value is updated on the same console line. The following snippet is a sample of such output > Building 0% > :dependencies > Resolving dependencies ':compile'. The information is updated on the same line, which is really nice. But sometimes we might need to run Gradle builds on a system that doesn’t support this mechanism on the console or terminal, possibly an continuous integration server. To disable the progress logging we can set the environment variable TERM to the value dumb.

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Awesome Asciidoc: Adding Line Numbers to Source Code Listings

When we write technical documentation with Asciidoctor we can easily include source code listings. When we use the coderay or pygments source code highlighter we can also include line numbers. We must add the attribute linenums to the listing block in our markup. This attribute is used by the source highlighters to create and format the line numbers. We can specify that the line numbers must be generated in table mode or inline mode. When the line numbers are in table mode we can select the source code without the line numbers and copy it to the clipboard. If we use inline mode the line numbers are selectable and are copied together with the selected source code to the clipboard. To specify which mode we want to use for the line numbers we use the document attribute coderay-linenums-mode or pygments-linenums-mode depending on the source highlighter we use. We can use the values table (default) or inline.

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Awesome Asciidoc: Changing Highlight.js Theme

Asciidoctor is a great tool for writing technical documentation. If we have source code in the Asciidoc markup we can set the document attribute source-highlighter to pigments, coderay, prettify and highlightjs. When we use highlight.js we can also add an extra document attribute highlightjs-theme with the value of a highlight.js theme. If we do not specify the highlightjs-theme the default theme github is used.

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Groovy Goodness: Using Layouts with MarkupTemplateEngine

The MarkupTemplateEngine added in Groovy 2.3 is very powerful. We can define layout templates with common markup we want to be used in multiple other templates. In the layout template we define placeholders for variables and content blocks surrounded by shared markup. We define values for these variables and content blocks in the actual template. We even can choose to propagate model attributes from the template to the layout template.

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Gradle Goodness: Getting More Dependency Insight

In most of our projects we have dependencies on other code, like libraries or other projects. Gradle has a nice DSL to define dependencies. Dependencies are grouped in dependency configurations. These configuration can be created by ourselves or added via a plugin. Once we have defined our dependencies we get a nice overview of all dependencies in our project with the dependencies task. We can add the optional argument --configuration to only see dependencies for the given configuration. But we can even check for a specific dependency where it is used, any transitive dependencies and how the version is resolved.

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