Posts by Christophe Hesters

HotSpot JVM optimizations

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Christophe Hesters

This is an overview of some optimization techniques used by Hotspot JVM to increase performance. I will start by giving a small example of how I ran into these optimizations while writing a naive benchmark. Each optimization is then explained with a short example and ends with some pointers on how to analyze your own code.

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Publish your backend API typings as an NPM package

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Christophe Hesters
In this post I suggest a way to publish your backend API typings as an NPM package. Frontend projects using can then depend on these typings to gain compile time type safety and code completion when using Typescript.

It’s quite common in a microservice style architecture to provide a type-safe client library that other services can use to communicate with your service. This can be package with a Retrofit client published to nexus by the maintainer of the service. Some projects might also generate that code from a OpenAPI spec or a gRPC proto file.

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Kotlin Exposed - A lightweight SQL library

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Christophe Hesters

A big part of the fun of starting a new project is making a design and choosing an appropriate technology stack. If you are a Java developer and need to access a SQL database, a common choice is to use JPA with an ORM framework such as Hibernate. This adds a lot of complexity to your project for multiple reasons. In my experience, writing performing queries requires careful analysis. Writing custom queries is possible but more complex. For starters, JPQL/HQL queries are parsed at runtime and the criteria API is far from user friendly. Moreover, the extensive use of annotations makes it harder to quickly see how the database is structured.

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Transcoding gRPC to HTTP/JSON using Envoy

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Christophe Hesters

When building a service in gRPC you define the message and service definition in a .proto file. gRPC generates client, server and DTO implementations automatically for you in multiple languages. At the end of this post you will understand how to make your gRPC API also accessible via HTTP JSON by using Envoy as a transcoding proxy. You can test it out yourself by running the Java code in the attached github repo. For a quick introduction on gRPC itself, please read gRPC as an alternative to REST.

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gRPC as an alternative to REST

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Christophe Hesters

gRPC is a high-performance RPC framework created by Google. It runs on top of HTTP2 and defaults to the protocol buffers instead of JSON on the wire. As probably most developers, I’ve also been creating microservices for the past several years. These services usually communicate over HTTP with a JSON payload. In this post I want to present gRPC as an alternative to REST when most of your API’s look like remote procedure calls. In my time using REST API’s I have encountered many discussions about status codes (which do not map very well onto your application errors), API versioning, PUT vs PATCH, how to deal with optional fields, when to include things as query parameters etc. This can lead to inconsistent API’s and requires clear documentation.

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