JDriven Blog

Kotlin Exposed - A lightweight SQL library

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Christophe Hesters

A big part of the fun of starting a new project is making a design and choosing an appropriate technology stack. If you are a Java developer and need to access a SQL database, a common choice is to use JPA with an ORM framework such as Hibernate. This adds a lot of complexity to your project for multiple reasons. In my experience, writing performing queries requires careful analysis. Writing custom queries is possible but more complex. For starters, JPQL/HQL queries are parsed at runtime and the criteria API is far from user friendly. Moreover, the extensive use of annotations makes it harder to quickly see how the database is structured.

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Let's Play!

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Justus Brugman

After my last post, it would be a good time to do a bit more of a technical story. The goal will be to set up a Hello World application using the Play framework, a front-end based on Angular running on a Docker image, deployed in your local running Kubernetes!
So let’s play!

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Microservices: A workshop by Sam Newman

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Justus Brugman

Today I’ve been working exactly minus 23 days at JDriven. So as you might expect, officially I’ll be starting there at the first of July. For my new employer, this is no reason at all not to invite you on the seminars they provide for their people, so yes this proved as well there is a reason to make this next step into choosing for JDriven. So last Thursday there I headed to headquarters at Nieuwegein for a full day workshop about Microservices, given by nobody else than Sam Newman!

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Awesome Asciidoctor: Don't Wrap Lines in All Listing or Literal Blocks of Document

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

In a previous post we learned about setting the value of options attribute to nowrap on listing and literal blocks, so the lines in the block are not wrapped. In the comments a user suggested another option to disable line wrapping for all listing and literal blocks in the document by using the document attribute prewrap. We must negate the document attribute, :prewrap!:, to disable all wrapping. If we place this document attribute at the top of our Asciidoctor document it is applied for the whole document. We can also place it at other places in the document to change the setting for all listing and literal blocks following the prewrap document attribute. To enable wrapping again we set :prewrap: (leaving out the exclamation mark).

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Gradle Goodness: Use bill of materials (BOM) As Dependency Constraints

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

Since Gradle 5 we can easily use a bill of materials (BOM) in our build file to get recommended dependency versions. The dependency versions defined in the BOM are dependency constraints in Gradle. This means the dependencies we define in our build that are part of the BOM don’t need a version, because the version is resolved via the dependency constraint that is defined in the BOM. Also transitive dependency versions are resolved using the BOM if applicable. We use the dependency handler method platform to define the BOM we want to import. The versions in the BOM are recommendations. We can override the recommendation by specifying the version for a dependency found in the BOM with an explicit version.

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Gradle Goodness: Manage Dependency Versions With Dependency Constraints

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

From Maven builds we know the dependencyManagement section in our POM file. In the section we can describe dependencies with their version and later in the dependencies section we can refer to the dependency without the version. We can use dependency constraints in Gradle to do the same thing. A dependency constraint can be used to define the version or version range for a dependency defined in our scripts or a transitive dependency. Just like a dependency the dependency constraint is defined for a configuration, so we can fine tune the constraints to the correct configuration.

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Awesome Asciidoctor: Collapsible Content

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

Since Asciidoctor 2.0.0 we can add the collapsible option to an example block. When the markup is generated to HTML we get a HTML details and summary section. The content of the example block is collapsed (default behaviour because it is in a details section) and a clickable text is available to open the collapsed block (the summary section), so we can see the actual content. The text we can click on is by default Details, but we can change that by setting the title of the example block. Then the title is used as the text to click on to open the collapsed content.

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