Micronaut Mastery: Using Reactor Mono And Flux

Micronaut is reactive by nature and uses RxJava2 as implementation for the Reactive Streams API by default. RxJava2 is on the compile classpath by default, but we can easily use Project Reactor as implementation of the Reactive Streams API. This allows us to use the Reactor types Mono and Flux. These types are also used by Spring’s Webflux framework and makes a transition from Webflux to Micronaut very easy.

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Groovy Goodness: Use Optional In Conditional Context

In Groovy 2.5.0 we can use a Java 8 Optional object in a conditional context. When an Optional object has a value the value is coerced to true and when empty the value is false.

Written with Groovy 2.5.0.

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Slim modular Java 9 runtime Docker image with Alpine Linux

With the release of Java 9, and the introduction of Project Jigsaw (the Java Platform Module System), we no longer have the need for a full-blown JRE to run our Java applications. It is now possible to construct a stripped-down Java Runtime, containing the minimum set of required modules. This allows us to create slim Docker containers without excess baggage.

The source code belonging to this blog post can be found at: https://github.com/rlippolis/java9-runtime-image

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Serverless Java with AWS Lambda: Introduction

Just as we are over the crest of the microservice hype and can finally see how this architectural tool might (or might not) solve our problems the next hype is already here: serverless programming! In this first blog post I’m going to explain what serverless is, what it isn’t, and how it can change the way we create software. In the next posts I’m going to show a few simple examples using a well known ‘serverless’ platform: AWS Lambda.

Originally posted here.

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Run one or Exclude one test with Gradle

From time to time you only want to run one test, one test method, one class or one package from the command-line.

Or on the contrary: you want to exclude / ignore one specific test or group of tests during the build cycle.

Excluding tests from the build cycle by the command line usually occurs when the following scenarios meet:

  • A test requires significant amount of resources (time, memory, disk space, etc.)
  • The run needs to be independent from the IDE (to reenact the Continuous Integration / Continuous Delivery pipeline) as some IDEs load test-dependencies on the compile-time class-path.
  • You have no or limited ability to change the code-base

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Run one or Exclude one test with Maven

From time to time you only want to run one test, one test method, one class or one package from the command-line.

Or on the contrary: you want to exclude / ignore one specific test or group of tests during the build cycle.

Excluding tests from the build cycle by the command line usually occurs when the following scenarios meet:

  • A test requires significant amount of resources (time, memory, disk space, etc.)
  • The run needs to be independent from the IDE (reenact the Continuous Integration / Continuous Delivery pipeline) as some IDEs load test-dependencies on the compile-time class-path.
  • You have no or limited ability to change the code-base
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Spicy Spring : Scheduler does not shutdown

On my current project we use Java 8, Spring 4.3 and Tomcat 7.0 as application server. After the scheduling functionality was added to the project the application server did not shut down any more, it hung till the end of time.

I like to use the default Java implementations when possible so the configured scheduler was the java.util.concurrent.ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor.
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Correlate your services logging with Spring Boot

In a modern service landscape, especially when using containers, you are probably using something like the ELK stack (Elasticsearch, Logstash, Kibana) to flow all the logging into.
But how to find from all those loglines what caused the nasty bug after a innocent buttonpress?
One of the easy answers to this is what’s called a correlation id – basically a unique number assigned to that buttonpress which gets carried around between the services and added to every logline.
Sounds good you say? it is so let’s see how to do this.
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Ratpacked: Add Ratpack To Spring Boot Application

In a previous post we saw how we can use Spring Boot in a Ratpack application. But the integration can also be the other way around: using Ratpack in a Spring Boot application. This way we can use Ratpack’s power to handle requests sent to our Spring Boot application and still use all Spring Boot features in our application. The easiest way to add Ratpack to a Spring Boot application is adding a Ratpack dependency and use the @EnableRatpack annotation. With this annotation a RatpackServer instance is created and started along with configuration options.

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