Archive: October 2015

Grails Goodness: Use A Different Logging Configuration File

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

Since Grails 3 the logging configuration is in a separate file. Before Grails 3 we could specify the logging configuration in grails-app/conf/Config.groovy, since Grails 3 it is in the file grails-app/conf/logback.groovy. We also notice that since Grails 3 the default logging framework implementation is Logback. We can define a different Logback configuration file with the environment configuration property logging.config. We can set this property in grails-app/conf/application.yml, as Java system property (-Dlogging.config=<location>) or environment variable (LOGGING_CONFIG). Actually all rules for external configuration of Spring Boot apply for the configuration property logging.config.

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Grails Goodness: Change Base Name For External Configuration Files

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

With Grails 3 we get the Spring Boot mechanism for loading external configuration files. The default base name for configuration files is application. Grails creates for example the file grails-app/conf/application.yml to store configuration values if we use the create-app command. To change the base name from application to something else we must specify a value for the Java system property spring.config.name.

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Grails Goodness: Use Different External Configuration Files

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

A Grails 3 application uses the same mechanism to load external configuration files as a Spring Boot application. This means the default locations are the root directory or config/ directory in the class path and on the file system. If we want to specify a new directory to search for configuration files or specify the configuration files explicitly we can use the Java system property spring.config.location.

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Grails Goodness: Using Random Values For Configuration Properties

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

Since Grails 3 we can use a random value for a configuration property. This is because Grails now uses Spring Boot and this adds the RandomValuePropertySource class to our application. We can use it to produce random string, integer or lang values. In our configuration we only have to use ${random.<type>} as a value for a configuration property. If the type is int or long we get a Integer or Long value. We can also define a range of Integer or Long values that the generated random value must be part of. The syntax is ${random.int[<start>]} or ${random.int[<start>,<end>}. For a Long value we replace int with long. It is also very important when we define an end value that there cannot be any spaces in the definition. Also the end value is exclusive for the range. If the type is something else then int or long a random string value is generated. So we could use any value after the dot (.) in ${random.<type>} to get a random string value.

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Grails Goodness: Using External Configuration Files Per Environment

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

Grails 3 is build on top of Spring Boot and this adds a lot of the Spring Boot features to our Grails application. For example in Spring Boot we can store configuration properties in an external file. A default Grails application already adds application.yml in the grails-app/conf directory. If we want to specify different values for a configuration property for each environment (like development, test and production) we can use environment section in application.yml. We know this from previous Grails versions with a Groovy configuration file Config.groovy. But we can also create different configuration files per environment and set the value for the configuration property in each file. We can use the following naming pattern for the file: application-{env}.yml or application-{env}.properties. These files need be in:

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Grails Goodness: Defining Spring Beans With doWithSpring Method

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

Grails 3 introduces GrailsAutoConfiguration as the base class for a Grails application. We can extend this class, add a main method and we are ready to go. By default this class is the Application class in the grails-app/init directory. We can override several Grails lifecycle methods from the GrailsAutoConfiguration base class. One of them is doWithSpring. This method must return a closure that can be used by the Grails BeanBuilder class to add Spring beans to the application context. The closure has the same syntax as what we already know for the grails-app/conf/spring/resources.groovy file, we know from previous Grails versions.

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Grails Goodness: Passing System Properties With Gradle

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

In a previous post we learned how to pass Java system properties from the command-line to a Java process defined in a Gradle build file. Because Grails 3 uses Gradle as the build tool we can apply the same mechanism in our Grails application. We need to reconfigure the run task. This task is of type JavaExec and we can use the method systemProperties to assign the system properties we define on the command-line when we invoke the run task.

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How to write bug free code - State

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Ties van de Ven

A lot of bugs are in some way related to state. So that is what we will be talking about today. We will start off with a quote from Einstein: “Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. ” Code should be consistent, calling the same function with the same input should return the same result during the whole life cycle of the object. Insanity and bugs will follow if this rule is violated. This sounds logical, but in practise it is quite easy to violate this principle. The main cause of this, is object state. This state is used in a lot of functions, and can thus affect the behaviour of our program at runtime. This principle can be even be seen in the most basic of examples (imagine the impact on a more complicated class...). Given the following class:

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Grails Goodness: Pass Configuration Values Via Environment Variables

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

Since Grails 3 is based on Spring Boot we can re-use many of the Spring Boot features in our Grails application. For example in a Spring Boot application we can use environment variables to give configuration properties a value. We simply need to follow some naming rules: the name of the configuration property must be in uppercase and dots are replaced with underscores. For example a configuration property feature.enabled is represented by the environment variable FEATURE_ENABLED.

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Grails Goodness: See Information About Plugins

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

In Grails we can use the list-plugins command to get a list of all available plugins. The list returns only the plugins that are available for the Grails version we are using. So if we invoke this command in Grails 3 we get a different list than a Grails 2.x version. To get more detailed information, like website, source code URL and dependency definition we use the plugin-info command.

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Spocklight: Mocks And Stubs Returning Sequence of Values

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

Creating and working with mocks and stubs in Spock is easy. If we want to interact with our mocks and stubs we have several options to return values. One of the options is the triple right shift operator >>>. With this operator we can define different return values for multiple invocations of the stubbed or mocked method. For example we can use the >>> operator followed by a list of return values ['abc', 'def', 'ghi']. On the first invocation abc is return, the second invocation returns def and the third (and following) invocation(s) return ghi.

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