Archive: February 2017

Grails Goodness: Using Domain Classes Without Persistence

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

Normally when we create a domain class in Grails we rely on GORM for all the persistence logic. But we can use the static property mapWith with the value none to instruct Grails the domain class is not persisted. This can be useful for example if we want to use a RestfulController for a resource and use the default data binding support in the RestfulController. The resource must be a domain class to make it work, but we might have a custom persistence implementation that is not GORM. By using the mapWith property we can still have benefits from the RestfulController and implement our own persistence mechanism.

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Groovy Goodness: Using The Call Operator ()

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

In Groovy we can add a method named call to a class and then invoke the method without using the name call. We would simply just type the parentheses and optional arguments on an object instance. Groovy calls this the call operator: (). This can be especially useful in for example a DSL written with Groovy. We can add multiple call methods to our class each with different arguments. The correct method is invoked at runtime based on the arguments.

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Groovy Goodness: Creating Root JSON Array With JsonBuilder

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

To create JSON output with Groovy is easy using JsonBuilder and StreamingJsonBuilder. In the samples mentioned in the links we create a JSON object with a key and values. But what if we want to create JSON with a root JSON array using JsonBuilder or StreamingJsonBuilder? It turns out to be very simple by passing a list of values using the constructor or using the implicit method call.

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Gradle Goodness: Check Operating System In Build Scripts

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

Sometimes we want to check which operating system is used in our build script. For example we have tasks that need to run if the operating system is Windows and not for other operating systems. Gradle has an internal class org.gradle.nativeplatform.platform.internal.DefaultOperatingSystem, but we should not use this class in our build scripts. The class is used internally by Gradle and can change without warning. If we would depend on this class and it changes we break our build scripts. But we can use a class from Ant that is already in Gradle’s class path: org.apache.tools.ant.taskdefs.condition.Os. The class has several methods and constants to check the operating system name, version and architecture. The values are based on the Java system properties os.name, os.version and os.arch.

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