Archive: October 2019

Converting Char to Int in Kotlin

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Riccardo Lippolis

The Kotlin standard library contains a lot of helper functions on top of the Java standard library for our convenience. Some of those functions help us in converting between different data types. For example, the String.toInt() function converts a number formatted as String to its Int representation. But how do we accomplish the same with a Char? Spoiler alert: NOT by using Char.toInt()!

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Kotlin method reference to companion object function

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Riccardo Lippolis

Functions defined in Kotlin companion objects are often seen as the 'equivalent' of static methods in Java. Although there are some similarities, there are also some caveats you should be aware of. For example, how to use method references (or, to be pedantic: function references) to refer to functions defined in a companion object.

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Java streams vs for loop

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Ties van de Ven

I had quite a bit of trouble finding a good article about java streams vs for loops under this name so I guess I’ll have to write it myself. In this article I would like to talk about the difference of using the Streaming API and for loops from the standpoint of long term maintainability of the code.

tl;dr: To reduce maintenance costs of your projects, please do consider using the Stream API instead of for loops. It might take some investment in learning to do so, but this investment will pay off in the long run, both for the project and for the engineers.

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Slicing Kibana logs with Vue.js

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Tim te Beek

Nowadays we frequently see companies adopting the Elastic Stack to search, analyze and visualize application data in real time. While the scope of application data ingested these days is broadening, it’s already quite common to monitor aggregated application logs in Kibana. Because of this, I frequently find myself coming back to Kibana to slice and filter the logs to monitor how our application deployments progress through deployments. In this blogpost, I’ll outline a small Vue.js web application I wrote to more easily access our application logs.

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Cultivating technical innovation in daily operation

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Jasper Bogers

Many companies that are undergoing a digital transformation are discovering that it is an endless endeavour. Technological innovation allows a company to become more responsive to change in their business domain, but also makes it subjective to progress in the underlying technical implementation. A lot can be said for the delivery pipeline optimizations that help deliver business value more efficiently, but how does your organisation keep up with technological innovation?

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Awesome Asciidoctor: Include Asciidoc Markup With Listing or Literal Blocks Inside Listing or Literal Block

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

If we want to include Asciidoc markup as source language and show the markup without transforming it we can use a listing or literal block. For example we are using Asciidoc markup to write a document about Asciidoctor and want to include some Asciidoc markup examples. If the markup contains sections like a listing or literal block and it is enclosed in a listing or literal block, the tranformation goes wrong. Because the beginning of the included listing or literal block is seen as the ending of the enclosing listing or literal block. Let’s see what goes wrong with an example where we have the following Asciidoc markup:

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Gradle Goodness: Stop Build After One Failing Test

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Hubert Klein Ikkink

Normally when we run tests in our Gradle build, all our tests are executed and at the end we can see which tests are failing. But what if we want to let the build fail at the first failing test? Especially for a large test suite this can save a lot of time, because we don’t have to run all (failing) tests, we immediately get informed that at least one test is failing.

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